Midland Railway release new song, She Loves Ted Bundy.

Midland Railway

Ted Bundy raped and killed roughly 30 women in six American states between 1974 and 1979. Some were as young as twelve. Yet time and time again we choose to discuss him and others alike. He has been described as a ‘Charming, intelligent and capable young man’, who wasted his potential with his acts. Are these descriptions meant to make us feel for him, that he was a victim to his own behaviour too? Can any of us remember the name of even three of his victims?

I admit I too am guilty of indulging in drama documentaries, movies and podcasts that discuss these horrific individuals. They are fascinating in the same way an atomic bomb is. Perhaps some of us have this infatuation with these immoral acts because we wish to learn to understand why they happen in order to prevent them, to see justice served and to understand that some of these people were just utterly normal-violence and murder aside, you could be in the same job as them and you would not realise. This shielded immersion into these lives exposes us to our own vulnerability, its past tense perspective cradling us into believing we are safe from harm when really we are not.

She Loves Ted Bundy

As this new track by Midland Railway suggests we can all fall for a Ted Bundy and not realise. psychopaths are deceptive, manipulating and cunning. They know how to build up a rapport that is alluring to all, their gravitational nature hooks its victims. We are all vulnerable when it comes to love for it can be as captive as a cocoon, you must transform yourself in order to break free whilst understanding it is not your fault you have fallen for someone so warped.

The song can also be seen as satirical commentary on our aforementioned obsession with true crime. This strange catharsis, this desire to be exposed to such vile people offers the opportunity for a psychological study into both our brains and the mind of the killer.

Similarly to their previous work, such as The Pokemon adventure, She loves Ted Bundy offers an upbeat musical number on our social interests. It’s combination of jazz and electra pop makes for a completely fresh take on Ted Bundy and focuses more on the women that fell for him, so although his name is in the title it’s really her story, yet it’s told through the perspective of a male narrator who is clearly jealous of her choices.

Midland Railway

There may have been times in our lives when we are aware that someone close to us is falling for someone who is not very good for them, our mental turbulence struggling to decide whether to step in or to celebrate for them for we see how happy they are. Most times our protective side takes over and we advise them that this person may not be right, we just have to hope that they will listen.

Read about their older songs here.

The Women this criminal attacked/murdered

Joni Lenz, 18

Lynda Ann Healy, 21

Donna Gail Manson, 19

Susan Rancourt, 18

Roberta Parks, 20

Brenda Carol Ball, 22

Georgeann Hawkins, 18

Denise Naslund, 18

Janice Ott, 23

Nancy Wilcox, 16 

Melissa Smith, 17

Laura Aime, 17

Carol DaRonch, 18

Debra Kent, 17

Caryn Campbell, 23

Julie Cunningham, 26

Denise Oliverson, 24

Melanie Cooley, 18

Lynette Culver, 12

Susan Curtis, 15

Margaret Bowman, 21

Lisa Levy, 20

Kathy Kleiner, 20

Karen Chandler, 22

Cheryl Thomas, 21

Kimberly Leach, 12

Number for National Domestic abuse if you are in need.

0808 2000 247

Be Part of The Band with The 1975

Naked, vulnerable and self aware, the 1975 expose their inner psyche in new song “Part of the band”

The 1975

With frontman Matt Healey deep into his sobriety after receiving equine therapy in Barbados it appears he has more of an insight into himself and what it is to be a member of a band.The drugs, the success, the sacrifice. The lyrics nod to his embarrassment with his few relapses with heroin “So many cringes in the heroin binges, I was coming off the hinges”.

The relationship one has with others when the are at war with themselves is usually a toxic one. The lyrics “And I fell in love with a boy, it was kinda lame I was Rimbaud and he was Paul Verlaine” are interpretational. It both nods to Healey’s experience ‘kissing beautiful men’ and thus the slight fluidity in his sexuality but also to the turbulent relationships he has with the band and himself. There is an abundance of fierce and feral love in our lives.It is difficult to navigate certain scenarios when we dress them the way we want them to look and when we can’t dress them but can’t leave some may cope by turning to substance abuse.

Part of the band- The 1975 music video

The coercive relationship between doing what we love and doing what we need can leave us in agony. When we haven’t quite made it to where we want to be and we are forced to take the route in the opposite direction, its as though our limbs are torn from us and we are left to get on with it. We have to do the expected or be extraordinary, how do you become extraordinary if you have to do as you’re told?

The 1975

The single is both satirical and personal, exposing the politics in people’s lives. Who’s is to say what is wrong or what is right? Just because someone is telling you what to do does not mean it is what you should do. It is easy to be offended by individualism when we do not agree with it. If someone acts or looks defy what we have already worked to understand we defy their identity, their ideals. We have to self reflect, we have to be better, not to be “woke” or to avoid being cancelled, but because it is best for humanity when we work to understand one another.

The final line of “Part of the band” is cutting. It will resonate with those who have suffered an addiction whether this be to a substance or to a person. It reassures us that things take time, that there is a both a daily struggle and nightly joy when yet another moon has gone by and you have not sent a text or injected, smoked, snorted or drank. You have breathed clean air, you have reflected, you have screamed and you have sang and you will survive tomorrow. And in Healey’s words ” it’s just not cool to be a heroin addict, is it? [Young people] don’t look up to junkies. I don’t look up to junkies”.

If you or anyone you know needs help ending drug use please consult these websites or speak to a health professional. In an emergency call 999.

https://www.talktofrank.com

https://www.nhs.uk/live-well/addiction-support/drug-addiction-getting-help/

Alvvays make their return with new single Pharmacist

ALVVAYS

Made up of Molly Rankin (vocals and guitar), Kerri MacLellan (keyboards), Alec O’Hanley (guitars), Abbey Blackwell (bass), and Sheridan Riley (drums), has been making moves in the indie genre since 2011.

2018 proved a successful year for the band after they received a SOCAN Songwriting prize for their song”Dreams Tonite”,at the Juno awards they were nominated as Group of the Year and their second album, Antisocialites, won the Juno Award for Alternative Album of the Year.After these accolades the band took a well deserved hiatus before being impeded by the pandemic.

Pharmacist by ALVVAYS

Perhaps it is unfair to pigeonhole this group into the indie genre as their instrumentals bleed into sub-genres as well as incorporating main stream pop/punk elements it is no wonder the success of this band continues despite their absence. Their latest release, Pharmacist is a ballad of unrequited love, trying to get to your destination by following misdirections and working to make peace with it all.If anything this single is closest to shoegazey with its distorted affects, emphasising the disorientation you feel on coming back to a familiar place to find most things have changed.

“…I know you’re back,

I saw your sister at the pharmacy

Picking up, said you had that new love glow…”

Lyrics to Pharmacist.

Blue Rev cover art

The lyrics call out to those of us who have faith we have moved on until we return home and focus more on the people in our peripheral vision than those in front due to the lingering hope that we may see our old love, see if they still hold on to the piece of ourselves we feel we have lost. But it is not because of them we are lost, because we are never really lost, we have merely changed, filled out in places that weren’t there before, read different books and look at different website. We are different and so are they. So even when we travel back home, on the look out for old love if we do find them, we must know they are not the memory we have of them, they are someone new.

Pharmacist has been hailed by fans as a supersonic comeback, tears of joy and revelation flooding down their cheeks. The single is a sneak peak into the bands new album “Blue Rev” which will be released October 7 of this year. It may have been a long wait before we heard them again but my god has it been worth it.

ALVVAYS on Spotify.